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To Be Or Not To Be? Why Do Muggle Born Children Choose to Attend Hogwarts?

If we look back far enough in our childhoods, there is/are a time(s) where we desperately wanted to be magical. Witches and Wizards have always held a deep seated fascination for children; whether they are deeply fantasy driven or merely really imaginative. Magic, in all its contexts and glory will always be the epitome to childhood. So it is no wonder that muggle born children choose a life of magic and wonder.

Imagine that you are a child. You are sitting at home; playing with your toys, possibly a sibling, or maybe levitating your leggos because you just found out you can do that. As a child you don’t know to be frightened by a strange and sudden magical power; so you wonder and test it out. Meanwhile your parents, whom you don’t know to keep this mystery from, are beside themselves with worry! Why are you abnormal? What is happening? Eventually you begin to feel the worry as well. You notice that more and more you are being isolated from friends and family. No one knows what to make, or do, with you — and they are frightened. Suddenly this magical power becomes the cause of your loneliness.

You are now eleven and you have just received your Hogwarts letter and a representative from Hogwarts has sat down, and at length, explained that you are a Witch/Wizard. The sheer relief that your ‘condition’ isn’t as abnormal as you thought and there is a whole society of people just like you is intoxicating. Not to mention the amazing things you will be taught to do over the course of your schooling!

Where is my ticket!?! Sign me up immediately!

Magic can be a glorious and wondrous thing indeed, but I think that the real motivator would be just knowing that they are not alone. Muggle born children with magical talents will go eleven years without knowing why they can make strange things happen. Not only do they not know the why, but neither does anyone else. Unless parents, right from the start isolate the child from everyone, there is no way that child doesn’t suffer some sort of ridicule or ostracize after all we are cruel about the things we can’t understand, the things we fear.

Eleven years is a long time to know and settle into the idea that you are different, but not just different…frightening. It can be a very lonesome road, even if your parents are fully attentive to you; we cannot survive on our parents love alone. The relief and gratitude of finding out that you are not alone and not at all frightening has got to be incredibly overwhelming. Instantly you are ready to transition into this new life of acceptance.

Of course having magical powers is just the icing on the cake.

 

Thank you for stopping by and reading my little essay :). This is part of Aentee’s month long HP Blog Festival in honor of The Cursed Child release on July 31!!! Check out what the rest of the month has in store, or look back on other posts, here. Also follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #PotterHeadJuly. There will be a Twitter chat July 31st to celebrate the release day for TCC! I hope to see you there!

P.S. Thank you Aentee for the beautiful graphic!!!!

I really hope you enjoyed this,

Love

Jackie

 

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16 thoughts on “To Be Or Not To Be? Why Do Muggle Born Children Choose to Attend Hogwarts?

  1. Lovely essay. 🙂 I think it’s funny that so many of us are drawn to the series and the fandom for the same reasons—having spent our lives knowing that we’re a little different, but it’s overwhelming when we find somewhere we belong!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. There is also the possibility that muggle borns choose to attend Hogwarts for control. After all, we’re always told about the dangers of magical powers run rampant when they are unchecked. So, Hogwarts is a place where they can learn to use their magic only when they want and not have it blast their neighbor on accident because their emotions got in the way. (Cue Harry with Aunt Marge).

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a great point! I imagine it would be rather lonely discovering you have a talent for something you can’t tell others about if you chose not to attend Hogwarts. And life would feel pretty mundane afterwards, knowing there’s magic but being unable to take part. If I was a muggle born, I would most definitely attend Hogwarts.

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  4. What a great point! I imagine it would be rather lonely discovering you have a talent for something you can’t tell others about if you chose not to attend Hogwarts. And life would feel pretty mundane afterwards, knowing there’s magic but being unable to take part. If I was a muggle born, I would most definitely attend Hogwarts. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I agree with everything you said! Most of parent would react like the Dursleys I think. It’s scary to know that your children could levitate objects and do other “abnormal” stuffs. And I agree that the children might be lonely. And they might be scared what if they hurt someone? And if the children are not nice, the voldemort type, then I bet they still would go to Hogwarts to study how to be more powerful. There are a lot of reasons why someone choose to go to Hogwarts, but I really agree with all your reasons! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  6. That is definitely great points you brought up on why it’s easier to embrace the magic and leave the Muggle world behind. I just thought up of this topic after reading Carry On by Rainbow Rowell, when one of the characters was dying to get away from the magic and mayhem. I would of course, choose the Hogwarts life any day.

    Thanks so much for joining Potterhead July and contributing this excellent post.

    Liked by 1 person

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